Posts for: July, 2014

By The Smile Shack
July 17, 2014
Category: Oral Health
CatCoras6WaystoKeepKidsOffJunkFood

Junk food and between-meal sweets are a habit for many of us, even though we know it is bad for our bodies and our teeth. As adults, we are responsible for our own choices. As parents, we are also responsible for our children's choices, and for teaching them to choose wisely.

Celebrity Chef Cat Cora offers the following six suggestions for leading children to a healthy lifestyle. Cora is a star of Iron Chef America and author of Cat Cora's Classics with a Twist: Fresh Takes on Favorite Dishes, in which she reveals healthier versions of classic recipes. In her remakes she shows how to cook with a lot of flavor while reducing fat and sugar. Cora has four young sons, so her methods are not just theories — they have been practiced in real life.

1. Remember who's the boss.

“My kids have never had fast food,” Cora said in a recent interview with Dear Doctor magazine. “The parents have a choice to do that or not,” she said. “The kids are not going to the grocery store to shop; the kids are not driving themselves through fast food chains.”

2. Make your rules clear and stick to them.

“Right now my 7-year-old tries to be picky, but it's really about us being consistent as parents,” Cat said. For example, in her household pizza is served only at the weekly pizza and movie night. The kids get a healthier version of what they want, so they don't feel deprived. The evening includes air-popped popcorn without butter — and no soda, which is bad for teeth because of its sugar and other chemical ingredients.

3. Offer your children a variety of foods and tastes.

Cora made sure her children tried different foods and spices from infancy, so they are open to trying new things. It's easier to get all the nutrition you need if you eat a wide variety of foods.

4. Learn to make tasty substitutions for sugar.

When her children were babies, Cora stopped relying on bottles and sippy cups as soon as possible, reducing her children's likelihood of developing tooth decay due to sugary residues remaining in their mouths. Now that they are older, she uses tasty substitutes for sugar such as fruit purees and the natural sugar substitute Stevia.

5. Include the children in meal planning.

Kids are more likely to eat a meal they are involved in planning and cooking. For example, ask them which vegetable they would like to have (not whether they want to have a vegetable).

6. Model healthy behavior for your kids.

Parents are the best role models. This is true not only for food choices, but also for exercise and maintaining a healthy lifestyle.

Contact us today to schedule an appointment to discuss your questions about oral health. You can also learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Cat Cora.”


By Dr. Jeff
July 08, 2014
Category: Oral Cleanliness
Tags: Toothbrush Hygiene  

We wash our clothes. We clean our dishes. We clean our floors. We keep dust off the furniture. But how many of us show any TLC for one of the most important hygiene items in the house...our toothbrush?

Urban legend has it that a dog's mouth is cleaner than a human's. While that may be true in some severe cases [like your weird uncle whose breath can cut right through a bank vault], our mouths, and therefore our tooth brushes, do harbor all kinds of bugs.

"The oral cavity is home to hundreds of different types of microorganisms, which can be transferred to a toothbrush during use," said Dr. Maria L. Geisinger, assistant professor of periodontology in the School of Dentistry at the University of Alabama at Birmingham.

Here are some recommendations to make sure your toothbrush is safe to you and those around you:

  • Don't share toothbrushes, and store different family member's toothbrushes at least an inch apart.
  • Rinse thoroughly after each use.
  • Allow toothbrush to air dry after each use, preferably in the upright position.
  • This will keep bacteria from breeding. Don't store in a small, moist, closed container.
  • Replace your toothbrush after having a cold or the flu.
  • If you have a compromised immune system, rinse your mouth with an antibacterial mouthwash BEFORE you clean your teeth. This will reduce the germs passed to your toothbrush.
  • Get a new toothbrush every 3 to 4 months, or more frequently if you notice the bristles breaking down. While this won't reduce bacteria, it will ensure the best cleaning power.

And if that's not enough, here's one more for the list...

Keep your toothbrush as far from the toilet as possible or you may be brushing with something you don't want!!

"If you have your toothbrush too close to the toilet," says microbiologist Charles Gerba, PhD, "you are brushing your teeth with what's in the toilet!" He explains that when you flush with the lid open, contaminated water vapors settle on surfaces in your bathroom, including your toothbrush. Eeew!!

So, keep your toothbrush clean and upright, and your lid down!!

Dr. Jeff


By Dr. Jeff
July 02, 2014
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: Fillings  

Q: I’ve never heard these terms used in dentistry. What are they?
A: In the decorative arts, an inlay refers to a small piece of distinctive material that’s set into a larger matrix: a mother of pearl accent worked into the lid of a wooden box, for example. In dentistry, it means something similar: a filling (or restoration) that’s fabricated in a dental laboratory, and then set into a tooth in an area that has been damaged or lost.

Q: What’s the difference between inlays and onlays?
A: An inlay is made to fit in between the cusps (small points or ridges) of a back tooth (molar or premolar), and it covers only a small region of the biting surface of the tooth. If the restoration covers one or more of the cusps, it’s an onlay.

Q: Why would I need to have one of these restorations?
A: When a tooth has suffered damage (from decay or trauma, for example), and the affected area is too large to fill with a simple filling — but not large enough to need a full crown (cap) — then an inlay or onlay may be just right. Both of these procedures are considered “indirect fillings,” because the restoration itself is custom-fabricated in a laboratory and then bonded to the tooth in the dental office.

Q: What is the procedure for getting an inlay or onlay?
A: It’s similar to having a crown placed, in that it typically takes more than one office visit — yet an inlay or onlay involves less removal of tooth structure than a crown would require. On the first visit, after the area has been anesthetized (usually with a numbing shot), any decay is removed, and the tooth is shaped to receive the restoration. Next, a model of the tooth is made (either with putty or in digital form), and the tooth receives a temporary filling. The laboratory uses this model to create the actual inlay or onlay, which may take a few days; it is then permanently attached to the tooth on a second visit to the office. However, with today’s advances in CAD/CAM (computer aided design/ manufacturing) technology, some inlays or onlays can be made in the office and placed in the same visit.

Q: What else do I need to know about these tooth restorations?
A: Both inlays and onlays are strong and long-lasting restorations that need no more care than you would normally give your teeth: namely, regular brushing and flossing, and periodic checkups at our office. But because they don’t require the removal of a great deal of natural tooth material, they are considered relatively conservative treatments. After a thorough dental examination, we can recommend the type of tooth restoration that’s most appropriate in your individual circumstances.

If you’d like to find out more about inlays or onlays, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also read the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Porcelain Crowns & Veneers” and “The Natural Beauty of Tooth Colored Fillings.”




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