Posts for: October, 2014

By Dr. Jeff
October 20, 2014
Category: Interesting Facts
Tags: Halloween   Oral B   X-ray Safety   Stinky Breath  

With autumn in the air, this month seems like a good time for a brief potpourri of interesting dental-related items for your enjoyment.

Am I brushing long enough?

Thanks to recent technology, you no longer have to ask this question. The Oral B toothbrush company has a new iPhone app that you simply launch every time you brush! It encourages you to brush for a full two minutes. Oral B also sells electric toothbrushes with Bluetooth connectivity to provide you with real time feedback about your brushing habits. Just don’t let this technological wonder cause you to drop your phone in the toilet!

Is Halloween bad for my kid’s teeth?

Hmmm, let me think about this… I don’t want to discourage costumes and trick or treating but the fact is the sticky and chewy candy handed out on Halloween is some of the worst treats possible when it comes to cavity prevention. If your children indulge, please make sure they clean their teeth thoroughly before heading off to bed. Candy residue left on your children’s teeth during sleep is when most of the damage is done.

Why does my breath stink in the morning? 

At night, your salvia flow slows down to a trickle causing normal mouth bacteria to have a party! As gross as it may be, when you wake up in the morning your tongue is littered with bacteria poop! Ewww! To help, make sure to perform a meticulous oral hygiene routine before turning in and upon rising, including brushing, flossing, rinsing and yes…tongue cleaning! This will help eliminate morning breath and make the world a better place.

If dental x-rays are so safe, why do you  run out of the room when taking them?

At The Smile Shack we use digital x-rays which decreases the amount of radiation required to take x-rays by ninety percent or so. This is a level we feel is perfectly safe. The lead apron we have you wear makes the amount of radiation you receive almost imperceptible. Being exposed to that low level of radiation every day for months and years, however, is a different story. That’s why we take the extra precaution of leaving the room.

More questions? Contact Us

 


By The Smile Shack
October 20, 2014
Category: Oral Health
Tags: Tooth Pain  

ConfusingToothPain

Is it a root canal problem, a gum infection, or both?

Sometimes it's difficult to pinpoint the source of tooth pain; it can result from an infection of the tooth itself, or of the gum, or even spread from one to the other. Identifying the origin of a toothache is important, however, so we can choose the right treatment and do all that we can to save the tooth.

When a tooth becomes decayed, bacteria can infect the sensitive, living nerve tissue deep inside the tooth known as the root canal. This condition is called an endodontic (“endo” – inside; “dont” – tooth) problem. The infection inside the tooth can spread to the periodontal ligament (“peri” – around; “dont” – tooth) that encases the tooth and attaches it to the jawbone. Occasionally, infection of endodontic (root canal) origin can spread out from the end of the tooth root all the way up the periodontal ligament, and into the gum.

The reverse can also happen: dental pain can originate from periodontal (gum) tissues that have become diseased. Gum disease is caused by a buildup of bacterial biofilm (plaque) along the gum line. It results in detachment of the gums along the tooth surface. In advanced cases, this bacterial infection can travel into the nerve tissues of the dental pulp through accessory canals or at the end of a tooth.

To figure out where pain is coming from when the source is not obvious, we need to take a detailed history of the symptoms, test how the tooth reacts to temperature and pressure, and evaluate radiographs (x-ray pictures).

Unfortunately, once dental disease becomes a combined periodontal-endodontic problem, the long-term survival of the tooth is jeopardized. The chances for saving the tooth are better if the infection started in the root canal and then spread to the gums, rather than if it started as gum disease that spread into the root canal of the tooth. That's because in the latter case, there is usually a lot of bone loss from the gum disease. Effectively removing plaque from your teeth on a daily basis with routine brushing and flossing is your best defense against developing gum disease in the first place.

If you would like more information about tooth pain, gum disease or root canal problems, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this diagnostic dilemma by reading Dear Doctor magazine's article “Confusing Tooth Pain.”


ForMichaelBubletheShowMustGoOnEvenWithouttheTooth

What happens if you’re right in the middle of a song, in front of an arena full of fans… and you knock out a tooth with your microphone? If you’re Michael Buble, you don’t stop the show — you just keep right on singing.

The Canadian song stylist was recently performing at the Allphones Arena in Sydney, Australia, when an ill-timed encounter with the mike resulted in the loss of one of his teeth. But he didn’t let on to his dental dilemma, and finished the concert without a pause. The next day, Buble revealed the injury to his fans on his Instagram page, with a picture of himself in the dentist’s chair, and a note: “Don’t worry, I’m at the dentist getting fixed up for my final show tonight.”

Buble’s not the only singer who has had a close encounter with a mike: Country chanteuse Taylor Swift and pop star Demi Lovato, among others, have injured their teeth on stage. Fortunately, contemporary dentistry can take care of problems like this quickly and painlessly. So when you’ve got to get back before the public eye, what’s the best (and speediest) way to fix a chipped or broken tooth?

It depends on exactly what’s wrong. If it’s a small chip, cosmetic bonding might be the answer. Bonding uses special tooth-colored resins that mimic the natural shade and luster of your teeth. The whole procedure is done right here in the dental office, usually in just one visit. However, bonding isn’t as long-lasting as some other tooth-restoration methods, and it can’t fix large chips or breaks.

If a tooth’s roots are intact, a crown (or cap) can be used to replace the entire visible part. The damaged tooth is fitted for a custom-fabricated replacement, which is usually made in a dental laboratory and then attached at a subsequent visit (though it can sometimes be fabricated with high-tech machinery right in the office).

If the roots aren’t viable, you may have the option of a bridge or a dental implant. With a fixed bridge, the prosthetic tooth is supported by crowns that are placed on healthy teeth on either side of the gap. The bridge itself is a one-piece unit consisting of the replacement tooth plus the adjacent crowns.

In contrast, a high-tech dental implant is a replacement tooth that’s supported not by your other teeth, but by a screw-like post of titanium metal, which is inserted into the jaw in a minor surgical procedure. Dental implants have the highest success rate of any tooth-replacement method (over 95 percent); they help preserve the quality of bone on the jaw; and they don’t result in weakening the adjacent, healthy teeth — which makes implants the treatment of choice for many people.

So whether you’re crooning for ten thousand adoring fans or just singing in the shower, there's no reason to let a broken tooth stop the show: Talk to us about your tooth-restoration options! If you would like additional information, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Repairing Chipped Teeth” and “Dental Implants vs. Bridgework.”




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The Smile Shack Family Dentistry

3839 James Court Zanesville, OH 43701