Posts for: February, 2020

By The Smile Shack
February 24, 2020
Category: Oral Health
Tags: gummy smile  
TheTrueCauseofYourGummySmileDeterminesHowWeTreatit

What makes a beautiful smile? The teeth, of course: bright, evenly shaped and precisely aligned with each other. But your teeth can be as perfect as can be and your smile will still appear unattractive.

The reason? Your gums show more than they should when you smile.

What's considered a gummy smile is largely a matter of perception that can vary from person to person. As a rule of thumb, though, we consider a smile “gummy” if four millimeters (mm) or more of the gums show.

Fortunately, we can minimize the gums' prominence and make your smile more attractive. But what methods we use will depend on why your gums stand out. And it's not always because of the gums themselves.

It could be your teeth didn't erupt normally during dental development. Mature crown (the visible part of the tooth) length is normally about 10 mm with a width about 75-85% of that. But an abnormal eruption could result in teeth that appear too short, which can make the gums stand out more. We can correct this with a surgical procedure called crown lengthening in which we remove excess gum tissue and, if necessary, reshape the underlying bone to expose more of the tooth crown.

Another potential cause is how far your upper lip rises when you smile. Normally the lip rises only enough to reveal about 4 mm of teeth. In some cases, though, it may rise too high and show more of the gums. We can modify lip movement in a number of ways, including Botox injections to temporarily paralyze the lip. A more permanent solution is a lip stabilization procedure. It sounds bad, but it's a fairly simple procedure to surgically reposition the muscle attachments to restrict movement.

Your gummy smile may also result from an upper jaw too long for your facial structure. We can correct this with orthognathic (“ortho” – straighten, “gnathos” – jaw) surgery. During the procedure the surgeon permanently positions the jaw further up in the skull; this will reduce the amount of teeth and gums displayed when you smile.

Discovering the true cause of your gummy smile will determine how we treat it. After a complete oral examination, we can then discuss your options to transform your smile into a more attractive one.

If you would like more information on treating gummy smiles and other cosmetic problems, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Gummy Smiles.”


By The Smile Shack
February 14, 2020
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: Dental Implants  
WhattoExpectBeforeDuringandAfterImplantSurgery

People are choosing dental implants at an increasing rate to replace missing teeth, either as an individual tooth or as a support for other restorations. But unlike other replacement options, we must surgically install the titanium post at the heart of the system directly into the jawbone.

While the term “surgery” might make you nervous, there's nothing at all to worry about. Here's what you need to know about before, during and after this relatively minor procedure.

Before. While the actual procedure is no more complicated than a tooth extraction, it ultimately depends on careful planning beforehand. Using x-ray diagnostics, we prepare a precise surgical guide to help us locate the best position to place them for a successful outcome. We'll also need to check bone volume to make sure there's an adequate amount to securely anchor the implant. If the bone is insufficient you may need bone grafting to build up the site or another replacement option.

During. The actual procedure begins, of course, with local anesthesia to numb the site — you should feel no pain and very minimal discomfort. We access the bone through the gums; often using a surgical guide for alignment, we create a small channel or hole with a sequence of drills that gradually increase the size until it can accommodate the implant. We remove the implants from their sterile packaging and install them immediately into the channel. After confirming their proper positioning with x-rays, we can close the gum tissues over it for protection during healing or attach a healing abutment that extends through the gum tissue thereby avoiding a second surgical procedure.

After. Because we disrupt relatively little of the soft tissue and bone, there's only minimal discomfort afterward easily managed with aspirin, ibuprofen or similar anti-inflammatory medication. We may also prescribe antibiotics to guard against infection while the gums heal. During the next several weeks, the titanium post, which has an affinity to bone, will become more secure as bone cells grow and adhere to it. It's also during this time that a dental lab creates your permanent crown or other restoration that matches the color and tooth shape so it will blend with your other teeth.

This process is complete when we install the final restoration onto the implant. You'll have a new smile and better function.

If you would like more information on dental implants, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Dental Implant Surgery.”


SedationTherapycanreduceAnxietyinChildrenduringDentalVisits

Making sure children are comfortable when visiting the dentist is an essential part of creating a lifetime habit of dental care. We recommend children start dental visits around their first birthday.

But for some children this may not be enough — despite parents’ and dentists’ best efforts they may still develop an inordinate fear of dental visits and even routine procedures. This kind of anxiety could inhibit them now and later in life from receiving needed dental care.

To relieve this anxiety, dentists have developed sedation therapy for children. Not to be confused with anesthesia, which numbs pain, sedation uses drugs to place a patient in a relaxed state. Depending on the drugs and dosage used, we’re able to achieve anywhere from a light state of relaxation to a deep suppression of consciousness. The approach is similar to one used with adults, although drug dosages and applications will differ with children.

 If we’re planning to use sedation with your child we recommend you feed them a low-fat dinner the night before and then refrain from any other foods or liquids until after treatment the next day. Just before the procedure (and after we’ve evaluated them physically to be sure they’re healthy enough for the sedation medication), we’ll administer the sedative, usually Midazolam and Hydroxyzine. Taken by mouth in a syrup form, this places them in a mildly relaxed state.

During the procedure a designated staff member will continually monitor their pulse, breathing, blood pressure and other vital signs. We may also take other protective measures like special chair positioning or immobilization to keep movement to a minimum.

After the procedure, your child will remain in the office until their vital signs return to pre-sedation levels. Once at home, you should keep an eye on them for the rest of the day. They should not return to school or regular activities until the next day.

As sedation medication and techniques continue to advance, they’re becoming a routine part of dental care. If your child experiences anxiety, this can help make dental visits more pleasant and more likely to become part of their life from now on.

If you would like more information on taking the anxiety out of children’s dental care, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Sedation Dentistry for Kids.”




Contact Us

Please do not submit any Protected Health Information (PHI).

The Smile Shack Family Dentistry

3839 James Court Zanesville, OH 43701